5 False Arguments for Raw Milk

Some people who enjoy raw milk also make up false claims that regular milk is more dangerous.

Filed under Alternative Medicine, Fads, Health

Skeptoid #383
October 08, 2013
Podcast transcript | Listen | Subscribe
Bookmark and Share

Today we're going to drop by our friendly local dairy farm and pick up a quart or two of what has become among the trendiest of foodie fancies, raw milk. Raw milk comes straight from the cow's udder and into your glass. It hasn't been homogenized or pasteurized and has nature's full complement of fat, making it a scrumptious, creamy treat. But many of its fans aren't satisfied with touting its flavor; they also claim it brings a host of miraculous health benefits hitherto undiscovered by science. Health experts, on the other hand, warn against consuming it in no uncertain terms, claiming that its unpasteurized bacterial load makes it an unacceptable risk. Is one or the other of these positions true, or do the real facts lie somewhere in between?

Some raw milk lovers take their passion very seriously, almost to the point of a religion. It's fine to like something, fine to uphold ideological positions, fine to advocate to others. But it's never OK to invent bad science to defend a position; and unfortunately, it appears that's exactly what some raw milk proponents do. Here are five common arguments that I found being repeatedly made about the supposed evils of regular pasteurized, homogenized milk:

1. Pasteurization destroys milk's nutrients: False.

As we know, regular milk is pasteurized, and this is the key difference between it and raw milk. Heating food to reduce spoilage has been in practice for about a thousand years, even though the mechanism wasn't well understood at first. We now know that heat kills the microbes found in food; including bacteria, fungi, algae, and a whole host of other organisms. Dangerous bacteria, like Salmonella and E. coli, are the most worrisome.

We could sterilize food if we wanted to kill everything in it, but complete sterilization would also cook or destroy the food. It was Louis Pasteur who discovered in 1864 that a much gentler heating for only a short time was sufficient to kill such a high percentage of the microbes that food spoilage was largely mitigated. Today milk is one of many, many foods that are pasteurized to increase their shelf life and safety. There are various processes for doing this, but the net result is that the milk is briefly heated and then cooled again. Opponents say that a side effect of this is to destroy essential nutrients in the milk.

To see whether this is true, we first have to ask "What are these nutrients?" So far, the answer to this has been wanting. The nutrients in milk are mainly energy from fat and lactose, and these are unaffected by pasteurization. Similarly, the molecular structures of proteins and minerals are far too robust to be damaged by the relatively low heat. One fact is that a number of vitamins are found in reduced concentration in pasteurized milk, including vitamins B1, B12, C and E. Though true, it's a fine trade-off, because milk of any kind is a relatively poor source for these vitamins. Vitamin A content is actually increased after pasteurization.

Often, advocates point to the fact that regular milk is fortified with vitamin D as evidence that pasteurization destroys that vitamin, so it has to be re-added. Untrue. Milk is not a source of vitamin D; it's one of many products that are fortified (such as breakfast cereals, orange juice, and baby formula), and have been since rickets was a major public health problem in the 1930s.

Lactobacillus is a bacterium found in our bodies, and also found in cow's milk. Lactobacillus does help with our digestion and the conversion of sugars to energy. And, it is killed by pasteurization. While some raw milk advocates raise alarm over this, there's no need. Lactobacillus thrives and reproduces itself inside our bodies. There is no need to drink milk to get it.

2. Homogenization makes milk less healthy: False.

Raw milk is not homogenized like regular milk. Homogenization is just what it sounds like; making the milk consistent from batch to batch, and making the fat level consistent throughout each serving.

Homogenization is a simple process. The first thing that's done is to mix together milk from different dairies, making it more consistent overall and day to day. The second part is making it consistent throughout. Raw milk separates into a light, fatty layer on top, and a heavier layer on the bottom. Homogenization turns it into an emulsion, in which the fat particles are tiny and evenly distributed throughout the liquid in such a way that they won't separate like raw milk. This is just a matter of forcing it through a fine strain which breaks up the fat chunks into tiny specks. Presto, a homogenous product.

Opposition to the homogenization of milk is manifold, yet so far, unsupported by any good science. Most of it sprang from a mass-market 1983 book, The XO Factor: Homogenized Milk May Cause Your Heart Attack, which put forth a number of fringe hypotheses which were quickly refuted in the medical literature but achieved much more mindshare among the general public. The book claimed, as its title suggests, that the homogenized fat particles were responsible for a lot of heart disease. Other claimed issues included digestion problems, but again, once controlled testing was done, it was found that people claiming hypersensitivity to homogenized milk reported just as many digestion problems no matter what kind of milk they were given.

Raw milk may avoid homogenization, but the result is just a taste preference. No health benefits or detriments have been discerned either way.

3. Unpasteurized raw milk has less bacteria: False.

The whole point of pasteurizing milk is to reduce the dangerous bacteria, obviously; so this claim really had me scratching my head wondering how on Earth someone could have come up with it. Here is an example of one article that claims raw milk is likely to have fewer bacteria than pasteurized milk, this one from a web site called "The Daily Green":

...Provided it comes from a reputable farm and has been processed clean, it should arrive with a fairly low bacterial count (all milk, even pasteurized, has some kind of bacterial count). What has been shown with raw milk is that if you introduce pathogens (i.e., bad bacteria) into it, they die off. They think it's because the "good" bacteria (i.e., natural probiotics) that are in the milk naturally kill the bad bacteria -- just the way good bacteria in our intestinal tract kill off bad bacteria.

So if I might paraphrase, the claim is that yogurt-style live probiotic bacteria in raw milk kills bacteria like Salmonella and E. coli; but pasteurization kills the probiotics and allows the Salmonella and E. coli to flourish. Fair enough; however, this claim is founded upon two factual errors.

The first error is that probiotics kill bad bacteria. It's true that bacteria do feed on each other a lot of the time, but this is a far messier battleground than the simplistic miracle claim of "good bacteria beat the bad bacteria". In fact, a 2010 study in Sweden found that patients infected with Salmonella did not have improved outcomes when taking probiotics.

The second error is that pasteurization kills only probiotics and not Salmonella and E. coli. In fact, targeting those harmful bacteria is the entire reason for pasteurization. If it kills harmless probiotics as well, no matter; we don't really care about that.

Either way, the evidence is very clear that raw milk carries far greater risk of bacterial infection than pasteurized milk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention devotes an entire web site to reporting this increased danger:

Among dairy product-associated outbreaks reported to CDC between 1998 and 2011 in which the investigators reported whether the product was pasteurized or raw, 79% were due to raw milk or cheese. From 1998 through 2011, 148 outbreaks due to consumption of raw milk or raw milk products were reported to CDC. These resulted in 2,384 illnesses, 284 hospitalizations, and 2 deaths. Most of these illnesses were caused by E. coli, Campylobacter, Salmonella, or Listeria. It is important to note that a substantial proportion of the raw milk-associated disease burden falls on children; among the 104 outbreaks from 1998-2011 with information on the patients' ages available, 82% involved at least one person younger than 20 years old.

Without qualification, raw milk is substantially more dangerous than pasteurized milk.

4. Raw milk cures all sorts of diseases: False.

It's pretty common to find in the raw milk literature the claim that conditions like eczema, asthma, and allergies are all successfully treated by drinking raw milk. This claim is completely absent from the scientific literature, but alternative medicine journals have asserted on many occasions that the bacteria in raw milk better challenges a child's immune system, and thus protects the child from such conditions. This is exactly how a vaccine works, so really all they're saying is that raw milk is a vaccine against eczema, asthma, and allergies.

There are no vaccines against these conditions — although "allergies" is such a broad category that it's impossible to make any blanket statements. If it were possible to vaccinate against eczema, asthma, and all allergies, then drug companies would have done it decades ago for immense profits, as they've done with the existing vaccines on the market. Make no mistake, medical science would love to be able to prevent these conditions.

$2/mo $5/mo $10/mo One time

5. Grass-fed cows produce safer milk: False.

Most cows are fed grain, since it takes too much land and rare climatic conditions to let cows pasture graze. Although a lot of raw milk sources say that grass-fed cows produce milk that's higher in this vitamin or that vitamin or what have you, the only difference that's been consistently shown is that it contains a higher amount of a fatty acid called CLA, or conjugated linoleic acid. CLA is sold as a supplement in the alternative health industry as a cure for things ranging from cancer to obesity. There are a number of small studies supporting these uses in the alternative medicine literature.

CLA is found in all meat and dairy products, and it is indeed found in higher concentrations in grass-fed animals. But that doesn't necessarily make it a wonder drug. Unlike the alternative medicine literature, the science literature makes almost no mention of CLA outside of animal studies. There's certainly no clear evidence that CLA supplementation has any evident medical benefit, although it certainly isn't going to hurt you. In the real world, the tiny amount of CLA you'd get by drinking grass-fed cows' milk instead of grain-fed is almost certainly insignificant.

Regardless, it cannot be reasonably argued that the milk from grass-fed cows is "safer" than that from grain-fed cows.

The default feedback I'm going to get from this episode is that I am on the payroll of Big Dairy, paid to spread misinformation and put the small, enlightened dairy farmers out of business. The only people who pay me are my listeners, for pointing out bad information like this that can impact public health. Raw milk is indeed a health risk, but from what I've been able to find, it's not a huge one. It certainly puts fewer people in the hospital than bad meat. If you enjoy the flavor and don't mind the limited availability, I say go for it. But please, like it for what it is, and don't make up bad science to fool other people into sampling a potentially dangerous food.

Follow me on Twitter @BrianDunning.

Brian Dunning

© 2013 Skeptoid Media, Inc. Copyright information

References & Further Reading

Editors. "Probiotic Without Effect Against Salmonella." Science Daily. ScienceDaily, LLC, 19 Apr. 2010. Web. 6 Oct. 2013. <http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100419113654.htm>

Langer, A., Ayers, T., Grass, J., Lynch, M., Angulo, F., Mahon, B. "Nonpasteurized Dairy Products, Disease Outbreaks, and State Laws - United States, 1993–2006." Emerging Infectious Diseases. 21 Feb. 2012, Volume 18, Number 3: 385-391.

Macdonald, L., Brett, J., Kelton, D., Majowicz, S., Snedeker, K., Sargeant, J. "A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of pasteurization on milk vitamins, and evidence for raw milk consumption and other health-related outcomes." Journal of Food Protection. 1 Nov. 2011, Volume 74, Number 11: 1814-1832.

Paajanen, L., Tuure, T., Poussa, T., Korpela, R. "No difference in symptoms during challenges with homogenized and unhomogenized cow's milk in subjects with subjective hypersensitivity to homogenized milk." Journal of Dairy Research. 1 May 2003, Volume 70, Number 2: 175-179.

Reinagel, M. "Is Homogenized Milk Bad For You?" Quick and Dirty Tips. MacMillan Holdings, 7 Mar. 2012. Web. 6 Oct. 2013. <http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/health-fitness/healthy-eating/homogenized-milk-bad-you>

Wallace, W. "The Udder Truth." Salon. Salon Media Group, Inc., 19 Jan. 2007. Web. 6 Oct. 2013. <http://www.salon.com/2007/01/19/raw_milk/>

Reference this article:
Dunning, B. "5 False Arguments for Raw Milk." Skeptoid Podcast. Skeptoid Media, Inc., 8 Oct 2013. Web. 21 Apr 2014. <http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4383>

Discuss!

10 most recent comments | Show all 94 comments

Josie

Do you even know what pus is? It's dead immune cells, predominately nuetrophils. Typically it would be filtered out but even if it was present in the milk it would not provide any adverse health effects.

Your point about the corn is correct, though the comment about GMOs is incorrect. GMOs are generally as safe if not safer than the original. GMOs only pose risks when it comes to allergic responses, this isn't common place though. The problem is feeding the cows corn in general. Corn is subsidized and can be produced extremely cheap. This is the reason why cows are being fed corn. Grass fed milk is definitely more nutritious. Raw milk is very dangerous.

Did you know that you can possibly even get rabies from raw milk? Just a thought.

Ashlee, Hartsdale, NY
February 08, 2014 11:25am

*Cough*
*Smoker's cough*
*TB-from-bad-milk cough*

Bill, Canberra
February 09, 2014 2:12am

I've worked on dairy farms and been on many...it is a rare farm that i would drink raw milk from. Not that they are doing anything wrong, but cows are just not concerned about keeping themselves clean...grass fed or not.
Without impeccable sanitation, the chances of contamination are always there. And grass fed cows get mastitis too.
I would worry more about the organic farmer who can't use antibiotics to treat a sick cow and is more likely to sell questionable milk.

Peter, New York
February 10, 2014 9:13am

Count me amongst raw milk fans, but I enjoy it because I like knowing where my food comes from, in this case, from a neighbor. The animals are well-cared for, and the milk is wonderful. I only use it to make yogurt, which involves holding the milk at 180degF for 20 minutes, so I don't worry about pathogens. I just love the cream-line on top!

Beyond that, I agree that every argument I have ever seen in support of raw milk as some kind of magical super-food has been silly and unfounded.

There is no shortage of woo in alt-health and alt-food circles, and no shortage of suggestible, neurotic dolts eager to lap it all up.

Daniel, Upper Eastern Tennessee
February 12, 2014 6:28am

That to me is an unusual Yoghurt recipe, Daniel - so I wonder if that may be a raw milk sterilisation method

Most recipes I have seen heat the milk to around 85C and then drop the temperature by natural cooling to 44C without any period of holding it at the higher temperature. At 44C the starter culture is added and the mixture kept warm by wrapping it in a towel or placing it in a "yoghurt maker"

There is about a 5C variation in different recipes in the temperatures. The upper one is sometimes higher the low one lower

Phil, Sydney
February 15, 2014 2:54am

https://www.drrons.com/raw-milk-history-health-benefits-distortions-5.htm

V, NC
February 15, 2014 10:09am

Once again complete reliance on a very low understood science. You think science today can isolate every molecule in milk and know exactly what it does in the body and heats effect on it? You think that Northern Europeans and Middle Africans who went from 0% lactase persistence allele 10k years ago to 95% for the former and 85% for the later didn't have a health benefit from raw organic milk? Have you ever read Nutritional and Physical Degeneration? Do you understand the FACT that 'science' is mostly paid for these days and is VERY limited when talking about health and nutrition. Just go outside and see the obese sick people modern 'science' has given us. I'm not anti-science I'm anti-ego driven ideologies that rely on insufficient data and that gives horrible results.

Daniel Rold, Las Vegas
February 18, 2014 5:35pm

Thank you for writing this article. We are dairy farmers who buy our milk from the store. A few points for people to consider... cows on grass tend to lay in their manure more often and have dirtier udders than those that lay in a free-stall barn. More people need to speak out about the dangers of raw milk. Children and people are being hurt from this push for raw milk. We would get paid a lot more to sell our milk raw, so this comment is purely out of concern for people. It does not matter if you know the farmer, it doesn't matter if you see the parlor, the milking operation, etc... you cannot see what bacteria is in a cow's udder. Please if you purchase raw milk, pasteurize it quickly in an approved manner.

Anna, South Dakota
February 28, 2014 7:33am

I'm an ex-dairy farmer who agrees that milk should be pasteurized. However, the problem with pasteurized milk is that the government sanitation limits are much too lax. When I was in the business, milk to be pasteurized was allowed up to 850k bacteria/ml which is, in my opinion, filthy. Certified milk -- which can be consumed without pasteurization--was permitted 10k/ml. In my case, my milk which averaged about 1.2k bacteria/ml. had a much better taste even after pasteurization than supermarket milk. (Although that could also be because it was much fresher.) Never-the-less, most milk from the dairies should be much cleaner.

Roger, Limestone, TN
March 06, 2014 11:59pm

Daniel Rold! You require a source for your statement! You say you don't object to science but groundless claims about the state of it implies to me you don't understand a damn thing about how bacteria works!

Mr Dunning's biggest stake against Raw Milk is "it contains harmful bacteria, so we pastuerise it and so there is less bacteria", he even cited how many children (CHILDREN) nowadays fall ill due to Raw Milk. But hey, some of our progenitors were fine right? Obviously this is all weakly understood science, much like how you eat all your meat raw and never cook your eggs.

Damnit man, read a book, you're actively endangering kids with this kind of mind-set (source: 3rd point in the article, link and quote)

Jimmy, UK
March 29, 2014 9:26am

Make a comment about this episode of Skeptoid (please try to keep it brief & to the point). Anyone can post:

Your Name:
City/Location:
Comment:
characters left. Discuss the issues - personal attacks against other commenters, posts containing advertisements or links to commercial services, nonsense, and other useless posts will be deleted.
Answer 7 + 3 =

You can also discuss this episode in the Skeptoid Forum, hosted by the James Randi Educational Foundation, or join the Skeptalk email discussion list.

What's the most important thing about Skeptoid?

Support Skeptoid
 
Skeptoid host, Brian Dunning
Skeptoid is hosted
and produced by
Brian Dunning


Newest
The Black Eyed Kids
Skeptoid #410, Apr 15 2014
Read | Listen (11:18)
 
Oil Pulling
Skeptoid #409, Apr 8 2014
Read | Listen (12:24)
 
Skeptoid Media is a 501(c)(3) Public Charity
Apr 4 2014
Listen (1:13)
 
15 Phreaky Phobias
Skeptoid #408, Apr 1 2014
Read | Listen (12:44)
 
The Death of Mad King Ludwig
Skeptoid #407, Mar 25 2014
Read | Listen (11:49)
 
Newest
#1 -
Listener Feedback: Alternative Medicine
Read | Listen
#2 -
The JFK Assassination
Read | Listen
#3 -
Asking the Socratic Questions
Read | Listen
#4 -
5 False Arguments for Raw Milk
Read | Listen
#5 -
The Vanishing Village of Angikuni Lake
Read | Listen
#6 -
The Riddle of the L-8 Blimp
Read | Listen
#7 -
The Secrets of MKULTRA
Read | Listen
#8 -
Who Discovered the New World?
Read | Listen

Recent Comments...

[Valid RSS]

  Skeptoid PodcastSkeptoid on Facebook   Skeptoid on Twitter   Brian Dunning on Google+   Skeptoid RSS

Members Portal

 
 


"Conspiracy Theories"
inFact with Brian Dunning


Support Skeptoid