Author Archives: Bruno Van de Casteele

About Bruno Van de Casteele

Philosopher by education, IT'er by trade. Allround Armchair Skeptic, History Enthusiast, Father of Three. Twitter @brunovdc Personal website:

Rap: Partial Reporting on Partial Rhymes

I just don’t “get” rap music. That is not a value judgment, just my personal opinion, and your own may vary. The bad lyrics, the (lack of) music, the bling… it’s just not for me, I guess. However, one needs to … Continue reading

Posted in Science, TV & Media | Tagged , , , , , | 27 Comments

Finally, Some Good Science Reporting!

My last couple of posts had a theme: it was about how news gets spun or derailed (for instance by a sensational title) into something that’s no longer about the actual facts. So time to point out something good this time! … Continue reading

Posted in Science, TV & Media | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Art of Selling a Mule Story

I’m convinced that there are two distinct career paths in journalism. One is (hypothetically speaking) the journalist proper who pens a well-written piece showing the different, nuanced aspects of a story. The other one is the title editor, whose job … Continue reading

Posted in Cool Stuff, History, TV & Media | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Marshenge: Seeing Squares and Circles Where There Aren’t Any

I’m all in favor of citizen-science. It’s great that people are, for instance, poring over photos from NASA’s HiRISE mission to Mars. But sometimes that leads to aberrations: people mistaking very normal things to “mysterious” remains of civilizations. A recent one (which … Continue reading

Posted in Space | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments

Basque DNA Analysis Shows They Were Isolated a Long Time

That the Basque people are a bit special in Europe was already well known. The Basque are the inhabitants of a region in southwest France and northern Spain. They have a language (Euskara) that is difficult to link to other known … Continue reading

Posted in History, Science | Tagged , , , , , , | 14 Comments

How Does an Airplane Stay in the Air?

For the longest time, I thought I knew why an airplane stayed in the air. It was because the wings were curved, and in such a way that the top was more curved than the underside. Air moving over the … Continue reading

Posted in Cool Stuff, Science, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , | 41 Comments

Education Myths in a Corporate Context

Battling and countering myths is, of course, something we skeptics do a lot, especially here at the Skeptoid podcast and blog. But once in a while, some organization outside of the skeptical circle also tackles the topic of countering common … Continue reading

Posted in Cool Stuff, Education, Science, Skeptoid Podcast | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Mystery of Napoleon’s Body That Isn’t

This week we remember (especially in Europe) the 200th anniversary of Napoleon’s ultimate battle (and defeat) at Waterloo, Belgium. Napoleon is a famous and infamous figure in Europe. He was both a brutal dictator—responsible for the death of thousands of … Continue reading

Posted in Conspiracy Theories, History | Tagged , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Who Killed the Pig?

How do you train an archaeologist? Sure, you can teach all the methods and precautions in a classroom, using books, photographs, and videos. But at a certain point in a time you need to get hands-on experience, preferably in the field. … Continue reading

Posted in Cool Stuff, History, Science | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

An Awkward History of Kissing

Psychology Today is a magazine and website that aims to popularize psychology. It’s a good thing, too, as the more people get interested in this science topic, the better. The website also hosts a blog, where this article written by … Continue reading

Posted in Education, History | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments